Work Placement: Development 4

Design competition, Work Placement

Second interview is now on InDesign and almost done. I had been dreading this task for weeks but thought today that it would be best just to get on with it. Because Harriet had already transcribed the last interview we did, it was just a matter of placing it in InDesign and as Finn had already made paragraph styles for each type thing we might need, I don’t even know why I thought this would take long, it actually went super quick. 

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Work Placement: Outcome 1

Design competition, Work Placement

Another thing to design is the interview pages for the magazine. I literally had no ideas for this and thought I would focus more on the text, deciding point size and look at leading and stuff. I also tried different column width to see how we could work the layout for this, being that the square size could be tricky to design to. 

Summer show- Research 1

Design competition, Summer show exhibition, Visits

To start off this group project of coming up with a design for the summer show 2018 and pitching the idea to a panel, I have been looking at some exhibitions to see how they display work/ present it/ write about it/ label it/ guide you round the space/ design the exhibition guide etc. I have so far been to three different ones: Barbican, Saatchi gallery and The Whitechapel gallery and what I have come to think of as most important and what I look for as soon as I walk in is signs. Wayfinding. Especially noticeable (or not noticeable actually) was the wayfinding in the Basquiat exhibition at the Barbican. Consisting of a small map with one arrow, a lady that tells you to go upstairs first and a tiny tiny sign on a shadowed part of a wall reading “exhibition starts”, you’re supposed to go about your way hoping you’re making the right turns. Well, wrong turns were made, the lady directing people up the stairs had to chase after some who started wandering about on the ground floor first and people kept bumping into each other trying to find the most logical route to go. 

Collection Brief: Development 2

CIP, collection brief

Focus: chapter dividers. Continuing the things I mentioned in my previous post about designing the start of every chapter, I started scanning the type I painted so I could use it for my book. However, doing this I realised that the type didn’t look like I wanted it to. Zooming in on it really close, the edges looked all jagged and pixelated and basically not pretty. I tried to vectorise it in Illustrator but it still didn’t look good and I didn’t have the patience to try to fix it as I don’t know how to use Illustrator basically hah. It might have been the paper I painted on was too rough that made it that way, so what I did was to paint over it in Photoshop to smoothen out the ragged edges. Took painfully long but in the end I got the result I wanted as seen below (in the right image, the P and R and cleaned up but not the A so you can see the difference).

Book, chapter dividers, by Lisa

Next to the page explaining the brief to each project, I have made patterns that reflect that brief to make it more interesting (seen above to the left). I have yet to decide on the typeface though for my titles and body text, but something sans serifs and straight as a contrast to the painted type would work.

Google Engage: Outcome 2

Dialogue Studio, google engage

Having both my wave video and the built model of the pavilion, I put the two together in AE so you can see how the whole installation works. The waves will be projected onto the walls alongside some text that I have based my whole project on. As you walk through the pavilion you are surrounded by these huge walls that are 7-8 meters at their highest point, see the projections as you wander through it and also read the text to understand the purpose of it all. I want the experience to be like you are walking inside a crashing wave so scale is very important here and that nothing stands still.

Final DOOH- screen, by Lisa

Dialogue studio: risograph printing

Dialogue Studio, Workshops

A poem for the Riso

Dear Riso,

You look like something taken out of a sci-fi film from the eighties
bulky, beige, pink and mint.

Spitting out paper faster than I can blink pausing your rhythmic drumming
only when it is time to change the ink.

Colouring my fingers blue
Riso printer I want to love you
but right now
I’m finding it very hard to. 

Dialogue Studio: the world is my grid

Dialogue Studio
Photos by Lisa

If you know how to look, you can basically place your surroundings in a grid anywhere. Last Friday, using the outside and inside of buildings as a base- I created posters working with the grids I found looking at my photographs. A really fun exercise that got me thinking more about layout with text and how we can alter blocks of text by changing the tracking to get more control and a pleasing result. 

Dialogue Studio: Armin Hofmann

Artists and Inspiration, Dialogue Studio, Map of me

The Swiss graphic designer Armin Hofmann’s work is easy to recognize. He has a style that you appreciate the more you look at it and his designs feel modern to this day.

Last week I had a workshop in creating a poster in the style of said designer, trying to decode what signifies his style and applying that to my own design. Hofmann I think works a lot with left aligned small blocks of text and a bigger headline, two or three colours and geometric shapes that are allowed to take place in the design and those were some of the things I used for my work as well.

Using coloured paper and cut out text from a nature magazine (facts about different animals arranged to a block of gibberish) I moved the pieces around to come up with a suitable design. 

Seeing through words

Artists and Inspiration, CCS

Can a map be something other than an image and what qualities does it need to have? When I think of maps I vision the old roll down world map we had in our classroom in secondary school but really, a map could probably be just about anything if you think about it as long as it does what a map is supposed to do.

The non- digital way to layout

Workshops

Yesterday we tried out some layout design by using a paper with a grid on it and moving around cut out pieces of text which I found quite fun as it allowed one to change the layout so fast and you understood rather quickly what worked and what didn’t. Below are some of my tests, the last image being the one I felt was most successful and ended up gluing down.