Walk the line- Research 2

Studio- Give and Take, Walk the line

Diving further down into my three words, I decided to explore other ways to make them visual and began playing around with stamps and letters to see where that led me.

For this, I started to write the single word first somewhere on the paper and then developing it into something else after reading the word over and over and capturing what I felt while reading it. I thought it would be good to see what associations I made after actually constructing the word myself, putting the letters down with my own hands.

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Movements: Research 3

Dialogue Studio, Movements

I have been looking more into the zero movement and especially the works of Yves Klein. Klein was maybe the most experimental out of the people associated with the movement and the real motor, working a lot with performance, sculptures and experimental painting. He painted using his hands, people’s bodies, fire and was obsessed with blue as he saw it as the perfect colour.

Works by Yves Klein

I looked into Heinz Mack’s work more as well. He does installations, sculptural work, textures.. but the thing I am interested in the most is his work with lines and his passion for making vibration. Pretty abstract and strange sounding maybe, but looking at his work it makes more sense:

Movements: Research 1

Dialogue Studio, Movements

This project focuses on design history and movements. The deliverables will be a folded A2-A5 16 pager describing my exploration of chosen movement, and a motion graphic outcome. Starting off, I looked into 3 different movements I find interesting and chose De Stijl, Zero and The Washington Colour School.

De Stijl: Around 1917-1931 as a reaction to WWI, a group of Dutch artists set out to remake the world through a utopian vision and harmony and order. Exploring the ideal fusion of form and function, they wanted to eliminate all representational components, reducing painting to its elements: straight lines, plane surfaces, rectangles, and the primary colours red, yellow, blue, black and white. 

Google Engage: Development 4

Dialogue Studio, google engage

Today has been model making day and I feel completely creatively drained. I had planned to create shapes/ sculptures with lots of gluing together paper but after trying this method out for a couple of hours becoming more and more annoyed by the glue stains I managed to get on the paper and the overall panicky feeling I got when my glue-y fingertips continuously stuck to everything, I gave up. Instead I focused on folding only, creating shapes by bending the paper. This method was better for my sanity but it still took a lot of tries and tests before I got to a result I was happy with. It also works better visually actually as it looks more like big pieces of metal than what it did in my first approach, and that’s exactly what I want it to be. This model isn’t finished, I want to add light to it somehow (been looking into mini glowsticks and might go with that as I then can have coloured light). I’m thinking the glowsticks can go on the floor inside this pavilion to represent screens but I’ll have to try this out before making up my mind. I also need to make a little person standing in front of it for scale. One thing at a time though, now I need some rest. Phew.

Front and back of model, by Lisa

 

Pastiche 1560: Development 1

CIP, pastiche 1560

Though he did other sculptures as well and many paintings, Alexander Calder is essentially mobiles and I want one in my pastiche. A real one. Trying out some animation in After Effects and thinking about how to build something that can move and spin only ended up in me being frustrated because it didn’t look good at all. Because Calder’s designs are so clean and restrained in their visual language, animating something using only lines and dots seemed like a good way to echo his style but in my attempt of doing so I realized I lost that handmade factor that I would like to capture. What I made seemed too disconnected from the sculptor’s rustic studio overlooking the grassy hills of Saché, France. And that’s not good.

Inside & outside sculpture

Artists and Inspiration, Visits

I love sculpture, really. Especially outside where it’s a bit unexpected and kind of a treat to stumble upon (not literally haha). On right now at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery is London-based artist Helen Marten who exhibits screen printed collage style paintings alongside intricate sculpture installations packed with tiny details you only notice after going up close, but also a metal line (in lack of a better word) that runs along the ceiling of the exhibition space only to end up in a jumbled knot at the end.