Collection: Outcome 2

CIP, collection brief

Final cover proved not to be my final cover. Realising it looked too camera film-y I did some sketches of alternative ideas and ended up with using the sketch where I drew the pattern I had and made it into vector art that I then coloured in red and laid type over it.

cover sketch.jpg

Sketches for cover, by Lisa

This is the result and I finally like it 100 percent:

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Collection: Outcome 1

CIP, collection brief

My cover is finally finalised although the way there was long. Jumping from the red outcome to yellow papercraft I did when experimenting with one of my projects, I still wasn’t happy with the look and started instead to play around with type on the photocopier. The type didn’t turn out interesting at all but the strange marks that appeared at the edge of the paper looked good so I created a design with them instead.

Cover development 1, 2, and 3, by Lisa

Copying and rotating the image I created a sort of pattern that looks like arrows and kind of like a fast forward button. And that felt like it fit the book finally and it also felt like me  with the triangles, movement and a bit artsy so I’m happy with this.

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 1.21.31 PM

Collection final cover, by Lisa

Collection: Development 5

CIP, collection brief

Nearly there! I now only have one spread left and then I’m sending this to print (might redo the cover though). When placing images for the Kickstarter case study and the crisp vibe they gave off (seen below) I realised I needed to re-arrange some things in my design for the rest of the book to fit this theme as I really liked it.

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There is so much colour in my work otherwise that I thought having red as chapter dividers and the book’s main colour might not be a good idea. So I changed it to black instead and at once it got more cohesive which is good. Plus the patterns and type I painted feels more like Japanese calligraphy and I really like that. Thing is, now my red cover doesn’t really match anymore so I might have to think some more about that. 

Movements: Development 1

Dialogue Studio, Movements

Decided to develop some of my letterpress work into more refined outcomes so I made some posters out of them that reflect the Zero movement; focusing on repetition and the monochrome and creating light. The two last ones are developments of my own tests from a previous post where I made my own Klein inspired paintings.

Zero posters, by Lisa

I quite like these results! It’s a bit tricky to capture the design of the movement without making it look like copying but I feel like these both are zero and my own aesthetics at the same time.

Movements: Research 4

Dialogue Studio, Movements

Experiments with letterpress to generate some ideas that reflect my movement. Started out with the word zero and then thought about the countdown to zero as well so I incorporated numerals too. The most ideal typeface to use for this had been Futura but as that wasn’t available, the closest I could get was Gill Sans which because of the super round O works pretty well (although the fancy R annoys me somewhat).

Sketchbook, by Lisa

Then I started thinking about using the letters as shapes instead and made patterns with o and i which turned out pretty interesting. I really like the zero123 but also the red lines below and the pattern to the left of it. The countdown reflects the movement very well and the launching of a new way to look at and create art so using numbers in this way is something I could develop and refine to make it work better. Using Futura might make all the difference. 

Collection Brief: Development 2

CIP, collection brief

Focus: chapter dividers. Continuing the things I mentioned in my previous post about designing the start of every chapter, I started scanning the type I painted so I could use it for my book. However, doing this I realised that the type didn’t look like I wanted it to. Zooming in on it really close, the edges looked all jagged and pixelated and basically not pretty. I tried to vectorise it in Illustrator but it still didn’t look good and I didn’t have the patience to try to fix it as I don’t know how to use Illustrator basically hah. It might have been the paper I painted on was too rough that made it that way, so what I did was to paint over it in Photoshop to smoothen out the ragged edges. Took painfully long but in the end I got the result I wanted as seen below (in the right image, the P and R and cleaned up but not the A so you can see the difference).

Book, chapter dividers, by Lisa

Next to the page explaining the brief to each project, I have made patterns that reflect that brief to make it more interesting (seen above to the left). I have yet to decide on the typeface though for my titles and body text, but something sans serifs and straight as a contrast to the painted type would work.

Pastiche 1560: Research 2

CIP, pastiche 1560

The book Alexander Calder and His Magical Mobiles is a really pleasant read and full of quotes that I might use for my video. I haven’t given the text that much thought but I don’t want it to be too formal with only information so stealing some quotes from this book might be a good way to go. I’ve also looked into more of his style of painting and think I can use that as well for my project. Initially I wanted to write things out with wire to represent his wire sculptures but I think I’ve changed my mind- I want more colour.

Really like this print (to the right) and how much it feels like Calder. Using that somehow!

Pastiche 1560: Development 1

CIP, pastiche 1560

Though he did other sculptures as well and many paintings, Alexander Calder is essentially mobiles and I want one in my pastiche. A real one. Trying out some animation in After Effects and thinking about how to build something that can move and spin only ended up in me being frustrated because it didn’t look good at all. Because Calder’s designs are so clean and restrained in their visual language, animating something using only lines and dots seemed like a good way to echo his style but in my attempt of doing so I realized I lost that handmade factor that I would like to capture. What I made seemed too disconnected from the sculptor’s rustic studio overlooking the grassy hills of Saché, France. And that’s not good.

Pastiche 1560: Alexander calder research 1

Artists and Inspiration, CIP, pastiche 1560

Alexander Calder, originator of the mobile, was an American sculptor that managed the art of combining elegant with quirky. His mobiles are both adult and childish at the same time, every one of them having a personality of their own – making them easy to love for a wide range of people.

In my pastiche of him I will aim to capture his playfulness and simply the way in which he had fun when making his mobiles and his art, enjoying his work. The technique I will be using is either stop motion or purely digital. Or maybe filming his mobiles and how it moves, maybe placing it in different environments to see how it changes. Pretty undecided basically! I will have to see where this project takes me.

The one think I do know though is that my colours for this will be blue, red, black and white. Think lots of circles and plenty of black lines moving about. Up and away!

Dialogue studio: risograph printing

Dialogue Studio, Workshops

A poem for the Riso

Dear Riso,

You look like something taken out of a sci-fi film from the eighties
bulky, beige, pink and mint.

Spitting out paper faster than I can blink pausing your rhythmic drumming
only when it is time to change the ink.

Colouring my fingers blue
Riso printer I want to love you
but right now
I’m finding it very hard to.