Portfolio Project: Development 4

Design competition, Portfolio Project

Going back to my physical portfolio, I thought maybe the poster idea with a red poster combined with coloured smaller images on the back of it might not work. I wanted the printed portfolio to match the online one but it just felt too scattered. I wanted it to be more coherent, and a thing you could pick up and flip through. SO I thought I could make a book that was completely red but with coloured posters stuck inseide that you could take out.

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Portfolio Project: Development 2

Design competition, Portfolio Project

Having good, high quality photographs of your projects I think is probably more important the the layout and design of your portfolio. Photographing your work lets you put it into context and show it off from its best side and I think looks way better than mocking something up digitally because that is so easy to do. Putting together my portfolio I realised that I didn’t have any nice images of my projects (because I don’t like the hassle of setting up the photostudio and taking time to photograph something well) so this became first priority. 

Match and Mismatch: Development 1

Match and Mismatch, Studio- Give and Take

Working more on my ideas for the three concepts I got very into doing something that incorporated nature in some way and started sketching ideas that included the material more- so birches, leaves and oak trees but it wasn’t really working. It kind of felt too light and dainty but in the same way too messy as well. So I looked a bit at the designers that my furniture student found inspiring: Konstantin Grcic and George Nakashima. Nakashima makes pieces that focus heavily on the material used, so a tabletop could actually look like it was just chopped down from the tree.

Match and Mismatch: Research 2

Match and Mismatch, Studio- Give and Take

After meeting my client last week, I now know more about the bench and how it came to be, the designers he was inspired by when making it and the choices behind the materials:

  • Can transport easily
  • Minimal use of material
  • Low skill production process makes it easy to produce
  • The incorporation of oak makes it feel traditional
  • Slim design
  • Looks expensive but cheap to produce
  • Functional
  • Surface board can change size
  • Scandinavian feel
  • Made for commercial spaces rather than homes
  • Can be taken apart and packaged flat

Summer show- Research 1

Design competition, Summer show exhibition, Visits

To start off this group project of coming up with a design for the summer show 2018 and pitching the idea to a panel, I have been looking at some exhibitions to see how they display work/ present it/ write about it/ label it/ guide you round the space/ design the exhibition guide etc. I have so far been to three different ones: Barbican, Saatchi gallery and The Whitechapel gallery and what I have come to think of as most important and what I look for as soon as I walk in is signs. Wayfinding. Especially noticeable (or not noticeable actually) was the wayfinding in the Basquiat exhibition at the Barbican. Consisting of a small map with one arrow, a lady that tells you to go upstairs first and a tiny tiny sign on a shadowed part of a wall reading “exhibition starts”, you’re supposed to go about your way hoping you’re making the right turns. Well, wrong turns were made, the lady directing people up the stairs had to chase after some who started wandering about on the ground floor first and people kept bumping into each other trying to find the most logical route to go. 

Map of Me: Development 4

Dialogue Studio, Map of me

What my app idea is lacking and what I have been struggling to come up with is how the user will interact with it. I have gone through so many ideas (help!) yet none of them have really involved any interactive aspect and has mostly felt like a presentation of my findings and work. To tackle this problem I am now thinking about letting the user build their own picture of a place from the pictures I have taken in the form of collages. You will be able to save these collages to a gallery and make several different versions from the same picture.

Three examples of collages made from places I have visited and collected conversations, work by Lisa

Map of Me: Development 3

Dialogue Studio, Map of me

Placing conversations in the places I found them may not be working out for me. These images are two of my outcomes and I liked the result for about three days but now, not so much. I feel like I need to develop this idea more because it is just too one dimensional. The photographs aren’t really working as I would like them to because of the poor quality of my camera and the visuals doesn’t seem inventive enough.

First outcomes for app, by Lisa

So, I have decided not to do the photographs like this. Instead I want to make my app more focused on type and text, perhaps with a few images as well but very abstract and made from cut out paper like what I did in this post because I enjoyed that very much. I want to incorporate poetry more somehow and make the conversations communicate more by themselves. 

map of me: development

Dialogue Studio, Map of me

The opposite of what I had planned, my mapping of conversations has had to be done a bit backwards. Instead of first finding conversations and then exploring the area around it in search of a good photograph – I have had to do all the photographing at once. I wanted my images to be kind of high contrast between shadow and light which means I have had to time my work to London’s weather. I need sunlight. The lack of time I’ve had to focus on this has also forced me to change my approach. Maybe for the better!

The other day I went on a photo safari through parts of London I like – a walk I will have to do again but listening at different places instead of only seeing.

Contact sheets, photos by Lisa 

Map of me: Research 3

Dialogue Studio, Map of me

Earlier this week, I dove further into researching for my “Map of Me” project- this time focusing more on what type of imagery I want to use when photographing areas in London. My initial idea was to take pictures that show an overview of the place I was at listening to conversations, having the pictures black and white to give the text more focus but thinking about it more and researching architectural photographers I now really like the idea of focusing on how I take the photo as well in terms of capturing interesting angles and shapes to tap in to the tone of voice and feeling of that particular building or place.

After finding these photographers inspiring I made a mood board to sort my thoughts out. Each person is represented by two images each:

 

architectural-photographers