Movements: Outcome 3

Dialogue Studio, Movements

I thought the printing process would be pretty straightforward, I had my paper and my pdf and my print credits. But printing proved to be difficult. First try came on landscape on a portrait oriented sheet of paper, second one came out with the poster on the back the wrong way round, which I didn’t notice until I started to fold my A2 down to A5 and fold up the flap on the first page that reveals the introduction text to the zero movement underneath (a feature I added to make the design more dynamic and again make it more dramatic with a “reveal” kind of) and the text wasn’t there. Sigh. A shame because the registration for the front and back images was almost perfect. Third try came out the way it should (after I rotated the back poster in ID cause I thought that might fix the previous problem, but now I’m not sure that was the actual problem. Maybe that could have been solved by rotating it in the print preview or rotating the paper. hmm…) but the problem now was that the registration between front and back was off by one cm. So a lot. Way annoying.

Pager from both sides, by Lisa

So the cover is now sporting a vertical white line that is not supposed to be there and the letterpress image sits a bit too tight to the folded up flap on page one. But I am going to leave it like this because everything else is how I wanted it to be and I cannot afford to print it again. I don’t love it, but I like it! But I almost think it looks better as a flat poster than folded up because it just makes so much sense now. And the Zero movement kind of didn’t and the design seen laying flat as an A2 is almost more representative of that. The kinetic type poster though I think looks great.

pager2

Front and back cover, by Lisa
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Collection: Outcome 4

CIP, collection brief

My printed book has arrived and I really like it. It is bright and happy but still has a seriousness about it which is exactly what I was going for. It is so nice to see something physically that you have been working on for a really long time. I have learned a couple of things doing this project but the most important one is: it takes time to design a book. And there is so much planning going in to it. I have simultaneously enjoyed and dreaded the making of this book as it has been so extensive. There were so many images of outcomes I had to redo or clean up before it felt presentable for the book, so I hope I will learn for the future to keep better care of my work and take better images from the start haha.

The layout for my book is kind of Alan Fletcher inspired when he said that making a book is quite similar to making a storyboard for a movie, when it comes to the flow and pacing of everything from page to page. I have some consistent layout solutions throughout, like the introduction to each chapter looks the same and the explanation for each project always starts the same way with a small block of text in the bottom right corner and a image or images covering the left side. 

Kickstarter: Outcome 1

CIP, Kickstarter

Our final deliverables managed to look very cohesive and like the Neat brand- from the presentation slides, to the campaign page and its graphics along with the video and tone of voice in the presentation text on the website. I think we kept the Neat style but re- vamped it for the campaign, sticking to fewer colours and making our photos and mockups cleaner looking but still keeping the playful element. Our final preview page can be seen here along with the video.

I am happy with the end result and how we managed to put this together in such a short time, with other projects still ongoing.

Collection: Outcome 3

CIP, collection brief

So some problems happened when uploading my book to both Blurb and Issuu.com. With Blurb the size wasn’t right even though it was right in my InDesign document. It was repeatedly too small but changing the size even to be bigger for some reason never helped and it wasn’t until I made my document the exact size it said to make it in inches and removing the bleed setup that it worked. It also took a while to figure out how the site wanted the cover pdf to be uploaded (two landscape pages, one for outside cover and one for inside cover). But after that it finally worked!

Issuu.com presented another problem which was that the pdf Blurb made for me (combining my two pdf files containing the book + cover) took away some of my images. The yellow patterns for example that I had on my chapter pages transformed into solid yellow pixelated squares. Very very strange. And annoying because it cost 3 pounds extra to get that pdf. In the end I had to combine my pdf files myself through adobe reader and then the issuu version worked. Good to know! (not paying for the blurb pdf again hah).

Collection: Outcome 2

CIP, collection brief

Final cover proved not to be my final cover. Realising it looked too camera film-y I did some sketches of alternative ideas and ended up with using the sketch where I drew the pattern I had and made it into vector art that I then coloured in red and laid type over it.

cover sketch.jpg

Sketches for cover, by Lisa

This is the result and I finally like it 100 percent:

Screen Shot 2017-05-08 at 12.01.49 PM.png

Collection: Outcome 1

CIP, collection brief

My cover is finally finalised although the way there was long. Jumping from the red outcome to yellow papercraft I did when experimenting with one of my projects, I still wasn’t happy with the look and started instead to play around with type on the photocopier. The type didn’t turn out interesting at all but the strange marks that appeared at the edge of the paper looked good so I created a design with them instead.

Cover development 1, 2, and 3, by Lisa

Copying and rotating the image I created a sort of pattern that looks like arrows and kind of like a fast forward button. And that felt like it fit the book finally and it also felt like me  with the triangles, movement and a bit artsy so I’m happy with this.

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 1.21.31 PM

Collection final cover, by Lisa

Google Engage: Outcome 2

Dialogue Studio, google engage

Having both my wave video and the built model of the pavilion, I put the two together in AE so you can see how the whole installation works. The waves will be projected onto the walls alongside some text that I have based my whole project on. As you walk through the pavilion you are surrounded by these huge walls that are 7-8 meters at their highest point, see the projections as you wander through it and also read the text to understand the purpose of it all. I want the experience to be like you are walking inside a crashing wave so scale is very important here and that nothing stands still.

Final DOOH- screen, by Lisa

Google Engage: Outcome 1

Dialogue Studio, google engage

For my abstract wave approach I started making some test videos to see how I could go about this. After several tries and experimenting in After Effects but not getting the result I wanted I felt a bit frustrated as I thought I could never get this to be what I wanted it to be. It either looked too light and flimsy or not regular enough but I got there eventually with the help of a tutorial that taught me how to transform sound into an abstract pattern that reacts to the wavelengths of the sound.

Wave experiments, by Lisa

Map of Me: Outcome 2

Dialogue Studio, Map of me

Now that I finally feel like I like my app idea to the point where I’m actually inspired, working on my screens went really quick. After one intense and productive day I now have an app concept and a prototype to show. Thinking about how to make my application interactive, I decided that I want the user to be able to do what I have done as well- create poems about their experience of London and make them into posters that you then can print. Making your poems into visuals. It works by you choosing the letter that you want for your poster, then you pick the colour and lastly you write your poem on it, add to gallery and print!

In terms of the design, I used the same 4 colours I had in my first prototype (blue, yellow, red, pink) for navigation as I think these also work for this idea. The font for the text is Avenir Next Medium and the letters I have manipulated are set in Big Caslon. I found out that I like the outcome of the manipulated type better when it’s set in serifs but as I am overall a very sans serif person and I needed a type that wasn’t so ornate for the rest of the text in the app to fit with the kind of strict and geometric design, I went with Avenir Next as it a bit rounded so it matches the curvyness I have going on with the posters.