FMP: Research 2

FMP, Studio- Give and Take

Deciding the theme for my project would be “light” but not yet knowing what to do with that, I looked into some artists that has worked with light like Picasso and his light drawings and Cerith Wyn Evans’s huge sculptural light installations that I went to see at Tate Britain last year and really liked. Picasso’s drawings/photographs are so amazing but making something similar without it feeling like I’m just copying would be really difficult.

Picasso drawing with light, Cerith Wyn Evans sculpture at Tate Britain
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Match and Mismatch: Development 1

Match and Mismatch, Studio- Give and Take

Working more on my ideas for the three concepts I got very into doing something that incorporated nature in some way and started sketching ideas that included the material more- so birches, leaves and oak trees but it wasn’t really working. It kind of felt too light and dainty but in the same way too messy as well. So I looked a bit at the designers that my furniture student found inspiring: Konstantin Grcic and George Nakashima. Nakashima makes pieces that focus heavily on the material used, so a tabletop could actually look like it was just chopped down from the tree.

Match and Mismatch: Research 3

Artists and Inspiration, Match and Mismatch, Studio- Give and Take, Workshops

For the workshop next week that’s going to be spent in the darkroom, I have been looking into photograms and what you can do with that technique. Man Ray is very much a favourite, his images are so varied too ranging from very abstract to very concrete with the images being very low contrast which makes them very poetic. My favourite one is definitely the hand because it looks so alien and nice!

Man Ray Photograms

Match and Mismatch: Research 2

Match and Mismatch, Studio- Give and Take

After meeting my client last week, I now know more about the bench and how it came to be, the designers he was inspired by when making it and the choices behind the materials:

  • Can transport easily
  • Minimal use of material
  • Low skill production process makes it easy to produce
  • The incorporation of oak makes it feel traditional
  • Slim design
  • Looks expensive but cheap to produce
  • Functional
  • Surface board can change size
  • Scandinavian feel
  • Made for commercial spaces rather than homes
  • Can be taken apart and packaged flat

Walk the Line: Outcome 3

Studio- Give and Take, Walk the line

Posters for the gifs! Something I hadn’t really thought about at all until last week. Trying to get some ideas I started out sketching small images of different layouts I thought could work. I liked the images but couldn’t get the type right so I started experimenting with the type instead to see if I could get anywhere with that. Well, I didn’t. Thinking about movement, repetition and layering I tried drawing type, collage, cutting up type, blurring type, stitching. Didn’t like any of it. The only one I did like was the “may” in blue and yellow, however when I tried the same technique for the other words it just looked really gross.

Sketches for posters, Lisa 2017

Movements: Outcome 3

Dialogue Studio, Movements

I thought the printing process would be pretty straightforward, I had my paper and my pdf and my print credits. But printing proved to be difficult. First try came on landscape on a portrait oriented sheet of paper, second one came out with the poster on the back the wrong way round, which I didn’t notice until I started to fold my A2 down to A5 and fold up the flap on the first page that reveals the introduction text to the zero movement underneath (a feature I added to make the design more dynamic and again make it more dramatic with a “reveal” kind of) and the text wasn’t there. Sigh. A shame because the registration for the front and back images was almost perfect. Third try came out the way it should (after I rotated the back poster in ID cause I thought that might fix the previous problem, but now I’m not sure that was the actual problem. Maybe that could have been solved by rotating it in the print preview or rotating the paper. hmm…) but the problem now was that the registration between front and back was off by one cm. So a lot. Way annoying.

Pager from both sides, by Lisa

So the cover is now sporting a vertical white line that is not supposed to be there and the letterpress image sits a bit too tight to the folded up flap on page one. But I am going to leave it like this because everything else is how I wanted it to be and I cannot afford to print it again. I don’t love it, but I like it! But I almost think it looks better as a flat poster than folded up because it just makes so much sense now. And the Zero movement kind of didn’t and the design seen laying flat as an A2 is almost more representative of that. The kinetic type poster though I think looks great.

pager2

Front and back cover, by Lisa

Movements: Development 5

Dialogue Studio, Movements

Just before I went to print my pager, I changed my cover a final time after a series of tests because I wanted to incorporate more of the light aspect of the Zero movement. So I took some experimental photos of the shadows created when lifting the cut out pattern I did  a couple of weeks ago and really liked how they turned out so I decided to use that. Playing around with how to place it I eventually made up my mind on a design and stuck with it. The problem I have had with the red bit in the pager I tried to solve by taking the red completely off and focusing on grey instead so I did some tests with a drawing I did a couple of days ago where I using my fingers, created shadows on silver lines so the image looked like waves. Tried to place it in my layout in several different ways but none of them felt right so I ended up deleting that image completely and instead using the cut out pattern I used for the cover so they link.

Cover trials and layout decisions

And this is the final design:

Map of Me: Development 4

Dialogue Studio, Map of me

What my app idea is lacking and what I have been struggling to come up with is how the user will interact with it. I have gone through so many ideas (help!) yet none of them have really involved any interactive aspect and has mostly felt like a presentation of my findings and work. To tackle this problem I am now thinking about letting the user build their own picture of a place from the pictures I have taken in the form of collages. You will be able to save these collages to a gallery and make several different versions from the same picture.

Three examples of collages made from places I have visited and collected conversations, work by Lisa